July, 2011 Archives

Two Reasons (reason number one – a freaking kid’s movie)

July 28th, 2011 Permalink

There are two reasons I wanted to be a photographer/visual storyteller: the first is cinematographer Caleb Deschanel .  Many photographers are influenced by other still photographers.  I was definitely influenced by fellow Hoosiers Peter Turnley and David Turnley, but I did not know of them at the age of 10.  I fell in love with [...]

There are two reasons I wanted to be a photographer/visual storyteller: the first is cinematographer Caleb Deschanel .  Many photographers are influenced by other still photographers.  I was definitely influenced by fellow Hoosiers Peter Turnley and David Turnley, but I did not know of them at the age of 10.  I fell in love with images without words through the cinematography of Caleb Deschanel when I walked out of the theatre in 1978 after seeing The Black Stallion.

I had never seen a movie where the first half was almost without dialogue.  I loved horses, but I left the theater loving film and the power of storytelling without words even more.   I was so in love with it I could barely sleep that night.  I’ve since seen the movie over and over again – even as an adult.  I remember 10 years later melting down into tears over one of the scenes during Christmas break from college.  My brothers turned to me and said “What the hell is wrong with you?”    This scene was/is especially memorable for me. *link below.

The Black Stallion

First Washington State Warrior Dash 2011

July 18th, 2011 Permalink

Shot a bunch of crazy people in the mud on Saturday during the first Warrior Dash in Washington.

Shot a bunch of crazy people in the mud on Saturday during the first Warrior Dash in Washington.

Only 3 Songs

July 14th, 2011 Permalink

In November 2009 I had my dream assignment.  I randomly contacted a then stranger, Alan Chitlik about his work with  Backstreets Magazine shooting my favorite musician, Bruce Springsteen.  Before I knew it, I was on the phone with editor Chris Phillips and he was asking me to shoot the Detroit show.  I absolutely couldn’t believe [...]

In November 2009 I had my dream assignment.  I randomly contacted a then stranger, Alan Chitlik about his work with  Backstreets Magazine shooting my favorite musician, Bruce Springsteen.  Before I knew it, I was on the phone with editor Chris Phillips and he was asking me to shoot the Detroit show.  I absolutely couldn’t believe it and within 24 hours I was driving from Chicago to Michigan to shoot “The Boss”.

Unfortunately, photographers usually do not have free reign like they did in the 70′s.  Instead of running around the front and jumping on stage, photographers have to go near the sound board and they are only allowed to shoot a certain number of songs before they are led away.  We were only allowed to shoot 3 songs.  I was lucky enough to get a free front section pass after I finished my work, but I had to lock my cameras away.

I shared a small podium with some local Detroit papers and when Bruce hit the stage with the E-Street Band I fired away.  I’ve always liked Clarence Clemons, but I was concentrating on the main man for most of my time.  After hearing Clarence passed away, I searched for photos of him.  When I was learning photography an editor told me,  “If you shoot someone famous, always get as much as you can, because when they die, you have something valuable on your hands.”

To my disappointment I only had one or two shots of Clarence.   Whether financial or emotional, why is it that when someone dies they suddenly become more “valuable”?   Like a photographer we begin to think of all of the moments with them that we missed or didn’t appreciate. I think this is especially true of people who are not front and center like Bruce.  Clarence was a big man, and even though his saxophone was key in most of the songs I love, my eyes would always wander back to Bruce, leaving Clarence in the background.

Luckily, in life we have more than 3 songs to appreciate someone.  And sometimes it’s hard to remember.

Porch Parade

July 6th, 2011 Permalink

Someone once asked me what I did not enjoy shooting.  I quickly responded “parades”.  When they asked why I said, “Because there is all of this chaos and confusion but nothing really going on.”   Parades can also be exhausting in so many ways.  For the past several years I’ve worked for papers on the 4th [...]

Someone once asked me what I did not enjoy shooting.  I quickly responded “parades”.  When they asked why I said, “Because there is all of this chaos and confusion but nothing really going on.”   Parades can also be exhausting in so many ways.  For the past several years I’ve worked for papers on the 4th of July shooting just about every suburban community of Chicago.  This year I was glad for a a little Independence Day reprieve.  I sat on my porch with a glass of wine and let the parade go by.