Tagged: Northwest Indiana

Full Circle

May 13th, 2016 Permalink

About 16 summers ago, I met my parents for an outdoor concert at Grant Park in Chicago.  While I was waiting for them, I saw this cute young family playing nearby.  Little did I know that that family would be in our lives now.  When my parents arrived, I pointed them out and we commented [...]

About 16 summers ago, I met my parents for an outdoor concert at Grant Park in Chicago.  While I was waiting for them, I saw this cute young family playing nearby.  Little did I know that that family would be in our lives now.  When my parents arrived, I pointed them out and we commented on how cute their boys were (then about 3 and 1).   My mother brought wine, but forgot the corkscrew, so we asked if they had one.  The woman said “How did you get that in here?!  They took ours away!”  Turns out my mother had a pathetic look on her face and the security guard said, “Oh go ahead.”

We shared our wine with them and got to know them better.  Later that evening, my mother called and said “You’re not going to believe this.  We ran into them again in the parking lot and they saw our license plate and told us they were moving to Indiana.  I said, ‘Where?’, and she said ‘Dyer!’ and they are looking for a church near there!”  A few months later, they were attending my parents’ church and Katy was helping my mother at her preschool.

That little one year old I was watching is now graduating from my old high school (Lake Central) where he was the star kicker on the football team.  How strange but great it was to photograph this dashing, blue eyed young man’s senior photos on my old school’s new football field.   Also strange to think that it is the same school where my father started his career as the school’s very first football coach.  Congratulations Austin – go get em’.

Independence Day

May 4th, 2011 Permalink

One of the main reasons I have always loved Bruce Springsteen is that he had a conflict between romanticizing/loving home and needing to leave it behind.  I left home and moved to Chicago about 15 years ago, but I have always needed to keep it near.  My parents and many of the neighbors I grew [...]

One of the main reasons I have always loved Bruce Springsteen is that he had a conflict between romanticizing/loving home and needing to leave it behind.  I left home and moved to Chicago about 15 years ago, but I have always needed to keep it near.  My parents and many of the neighbors I grew up with have remained in my old neighborhood in Northwest Indiana.  Nick was one of them.  He and his wife Linda live across the street from my parents and their daughter Julie was one of my best childhood friends.

Nick was like a Springsteen song to me. He was a hard working man who was employed at Inland Steel – a tough guy who cried like a baby when his only son left to join the military.  My parents were teachers in an area of Indiana where most of my friend’s parents worked in the mills.  Nick personified some of  Springsteen’s songs when I saw him get up everyday and go to work in a dangerous place in order to raise his 3 children.  He built the home you see in the picture, collected his retirement and bought a few old cars to fix up.

When I come home for holidays, I watch him work tirelessly in his yard, and I see his pride and love for what he built with his own hands.  He doesn’t need anything else – he doesn’t need fancy vacations, 4 star restaurants, or a more exclusive, desirable address.  I envy him sometimes.

Today while I was getting ready to leave for my new, more desirable address thinking about how I could almost just stay in my old neighborhood, live next door to my parents and be happy, I saw Nick outside.  He said,  “What are you doing Suz, why are you going?  I guess it’s just your generation and I don’t get it.”

Sometimes I don’t either.